Womens Autobiography in Islamic Societies

The Ultimate Unveiling?

  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size
Home Events

Past and Forthcoming Events

E-mail Print PDF

Click on the event for more information

January 2010
The network’s first workshop on “Women’s Autobiography in Islamic Societies: Defining the Genre,” held at the University of Texas at Austin, 28-30 January 2010

July 2010
Panel on “Speaking of the Self? Women and Self-Representation in South Asia” at the European Conference of Modern South Asian Studies, University of Bonn, 26-29 July 2010

October 2010-May 2011
A seminar series on “Auto/biography” in the Department of Politics, History and International Relations, Loughborough University

October 2010
Panel on "Defining the Self: Muslim Women's Autobiographies," at the 39th Annual Conference on South Asia, Univerisity of Wisconsin at Madison, Friday, October 15, 2010, 8:30-10:15 a.m

December 2010
The network’s second workshop on “Women’s Autobiography in Islamic Societies: Context and Construction,” held at India International Centre, Delhi, India, 16-18 December 2010

December 2011
The network’s third workshop on “Women’s Autobiography in Islamic Societies: Representation and Identity,” held at American University Sharjah, UAE, December 2011 [dates tba]

Spring 2012
The network hopes to organise a conference on ‘Women’s Autobiography in Islamic Societies’ at the end of the project to involve additional participants completing research in this area.

 

 

January 2010
The network’s first workshop on “Women’s Autobiography in Islamic Societies: Defining the Genre,” held at the University of Texas at Austin, 28-30 January 2010

Sponsored by: Arts & Humanities Research Council of the United Kingdom and the South Asia Institute, University of Texas

Local organiser: Gail Minault [email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ]

Link to Poster 

The aim of this first meeting of the network was to assess the kinds of source materials used by members of the group as a means to thinking about terminology and definitions – or ‘defining the genre’. So, what do we mean when speak about women’s autobiographical writing in Islamic societies? Is it easily identifiable? How does it differ from autobiographical writing in other cultural contexts, particularly in terms of form and style? Does it change over time? Can we distinguish it from that of male authors in the same circumstance? And what does the type of writing tell us about the female author in terms of her understanding of self?

Back to top

July 2010
Panel on “Speaking of the Self? Women and Self-Representation in South Asia” at the European Conference of Modern South Asian Studies, University of Bonn, 26-29 July 2010

Convened by: Anshu Malhotra (University of Delhi) and Siobhan Lambert-Hurley (Loughborough University)

For more information, including abstracts of the panel and the papers, see: http://www.ecmsas.org/panels/P14_abstracts.pdf

Back to top

October 2010-May 2011
A seminar series on “Auto/biography” in the Department of Politics, History and International Relations, Loughborough University

Convened by: Siobhan Lambert-Hurley [email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ]

For more information, including speakers, titles and dates, see:
http://www.lut.ac.uk/departments/eu/research/SeminarSeries.html

Back to top

October 2010
Panel on "Defining the Self: Muslim Women's Autobiographies," at the 39th Annual Conference on South Asia, Univerisity of Wisconsin at Madison, Friday, October 15, 2010, 8:30-10:15 a.m

Convened by: Afshan Bokhari (Suffolk University)

For more information, including an abstract of the panel and a list of papers, see:
http://southasiaconference.wisc.edu/schedule/session1.html

Back to top

December 2010
The network’s second workshop on “Women’s Autobiography in Islamic Societies: Context and Construction,” held at India International Centre, Delhi, India, 16-18 December 2010

Sponsored by: Arts & Humanities Research Council of the United Kingdom and the Centre for the Study of International Governance, Loughborough University

Local organiser: Anshu Malhotra (University of Delhi) [email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ]

In this second meeting of the network, we will move outside the text to place it within a particular historical and geographical context. Hence, we take the theme of ‘context and construction’. In simple terms, who writes, when, why, how and for whom? To ask these kinds of questions will lead the discussion into matters of production, publication and audience in order to judge the impact of these external factors on the style and structure of the text. Female authors will also be analysed in terms of their class, education, family background and location so as to identify motivations not only specific to the individual, but also in relation to broader socio-economic and cultural trends. Perhaps it will enable participants to identify why, for instance, it is only in the early twentieth century that Muslim women begin writing their life stories in ever greater numbers, even though there were some pioneers before that time.

Back to top

December 2011
The network’s third workshop on “Women’s Autobiography in Islamic Societies: Representation and Identity,” held at American University Sharjah, UAE, December 2011 [dates tba]

Local organiser: Nawar al-Hassan Golley [email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ]

This third and final meeting of the network will draw attention back to the content of autobiographical narratives by identifying various themes and sub-themes: from shifting nationality and regional identity to motherhood, the home and sexuality. As these motifs point to the way in which an author chooses to present herself, whether intentionally or otherwise, the main focus will be ‘representation and identity’. Again, we may ask if the themes taken up by female authors differ from those of men in the same circumstance, as those well as those writing their lives in different cultural and historical contexts. Ultimately, is there something unique about women’s autobiography in Islamic societies that allows us to distinguish this body of material, regardless of the time and place?

Back to top

Spring 2012
The network hopes to organise a conference on ‘Women’s Autobiography in Islamic Societies’at the end of the project to involve additional participants completing research in this area. If you are interested in being involved, please contact Siobhan Lambert-Hurley to be put on the mailing list [email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ] 

Back to top

Last Updated on Tuesday, 20 July 2010 21:17